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Nhung


Turning research into great experience 

 

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Nhung


Turning research into great experience 

 

Thinker. Doer. Listener. Team player. Wanderer. Striving for the sweet spot of desirability, viability and feasibility. 

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SOME OF MY WORK

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Tourism Philippines


Tourism Philippines

 

Tourism Philippines


Tourism Philippines

 

BACKGROUND

The Philippine Department of Tourism approached the consulting team at Ripple Effect Group about using digital channels to increase the number of visitors from Australia and New Zealand.

DESIGN PROCESS

We mapped out four personas based on research to guide our design process. We then put the personas in different scenarios to explore their needs, emotions and motivations.

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The scenarios were categorised in a site map through a number of iterations and helped inform the site’s content.

Once the different content types were identified, I created low-fidelity wireframes for each and worked with the team to refine them. I also defined the look and feel of the site as well as other social channels. I worked closely with the development and content management team to advocate user needs and clarify design intent.

For the whole project, we kept a high level of transparency with the client, informing them of our progress at different milestones.

OUTCOMES

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In addition to creating content and a consistent look across different social channels, we developed a customised responsive Wordpress website. The site received more than a million visits within the first 3 months after launch.

MY ROLE

As the UX lead and visual designer in the project, I was responsible for:

  • Conducting extensive research including industry best practice and workshop with users.

  • Creating information architecture based on personas, user journeys, content audit and card sorting.

  • Generating low-fidelity wireframes for different page layouts.

  • Specifying design guidelines, information architecture, functional requirements. and visual design in the website design brief document.

  • Working together with the development team for quality assurance.

TEAM

  • Jessica Erhart: Lead consultant

  • Nhung Nguyen: UX Lead & Visual designer

  • Iain McDougall: Content manager

  • Jordan Gillman: Wordpress Developer

  • Joel Gralton: Web developer

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SWOOP Analytics


SWOOP Analytics

 

SWOOP Analytics


SWOOP Analytics

 

BACKGROUND

Optimice, a consulting company in enterprise technology asked Ripple Effect Group to help them design the user experience of SWOOP, an analytic platform for enterprise social networks such as Yammer.

Unlike other analytics platforms that simply measure views, likes and shares, SWOOP focuses on meaningful connection and identifies where collaboration occurs, or where it is absent.

FINDINGS

While the backend of the platform was working in the initial proof-of-concept, SWOOP had difficulty conveying the complex data and its value to potential customers. This requires the new design to give useful, contextual guidance for users for each set of data.

From research and user stories, we identified that SWOOP’s audience is interested in looking at data using different scales of reference: ie from personal networks to business units, or from regional offices up to the enterprise-wide level. The new navigation model allow users to navigate the different sets of data accordingly.

DESIGN PROCESS

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We conducted a landscape review in social analytics platforms for best practices and potential pitfalls. Following Stephen Few’s information dashboard design principles, we recommended that SWOOP stay away from the highly popular gauge charts, which are not easy to read and take up a substantial amount of real estate on screens.

During initial testing and feedback, some users found it difficult to understand the existing terminology on the site, so we recommended a more common-sense, accessible style of copy.

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Once the basic structure of the site and the interaction model was established, I designed the platform interface, and created a library for the most common patterns. This helped form a consistent and pleasing visual rhythm throughout the platform. I chose design elements that were flexible and adaptable to future changes.

OUTCOMES

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The newly designed platform made significant improvements on the initial proof-of –concept by:

  • Using consistent navigation patterns that align with the user’s mental model.
  • Removing unnecessary elements in the graphs and charts to simplify the reading experience at a glance.
  • Providing contextual explanations for unfamiliar data, and calls-to-action for users to improve their personal or team score.
  • Creating a visually pleasing platform to improve the overall experience.
  • The new design received positive feedback from users during testing and is currently being developed.

MY ROLE

As the UX and UI designer for the project, I was responsible for:

  • Identifying and prioritising user needs.
  • Defining information architecture based on user stories.
  • Providing recommendations on information hierarchy and dashboard design.
  • Developing annotated low-fidelity wireframes that iterate based on the client’s feedback.
  • Creating high-fidelity wireframes and developing visual design guidelines for the platform.
  • Writing design specifications to clearly communicate design intent and front-end requirements to the platform developer.

TEAM

  • Cai Kjaer: Product owner
  • James Dellow: Project manager/Lead consultant
  • Nhung Nguyen: UX/UI designer
  • Paul Robertson: Developer
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Cochlear project


Cochlear User support materials 

 

Cochlear project


Cochlear User support materials 

 

BACKGROUND

Cochlear is an Australian company that provides innovative implant solutions to hearing loss. Since 1981, the company has given around 250,000 worldwide recipients the ability to hear.

Cochlear is expanding its market in developing countries such as India, China, and Eastern Europe with a new product line. They asked the team at Automatic Studio to help them design a better User Support Materials (User Guide, Getting Started Guide) package to accompany the new product.

FINDINGS

In our immersive research, we identified the main challenges for this particular market:

  • The cost of surgery, the Cochlear implant and sound processor is extremely expensive for this market. In most cases, due to the huge amount of investment and the stressful journey, people expect the product to work like magic.
  • Cochlear recipients are likely to be in noisy and dusty environment, which means correct usage and maintenance for the devices are vital.
  • Most recipients live far away from health care centres and don’t have regular access to hearing clinics. If something goes wrong with the device, the process of sending it off for repair is long and fraught with problems, and it means the recipient will not be hearing during this time.
  • While this means some simple errors can be avoided with a good user guide, people tend to treat the user support materials document as highly important medical documents and put them away in locked safe.
  • Also, some primary carers may be illiterate or unable to interpret a complicated technical document.

DESIGN PROCESS

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From what we gathered from the discovery phase, we wanted to design a product that, in addition to being easy to use, would be readily consulted instead of locked away. We also found in our research that one of the common features of houses in this kind of socio-economic group is the wall calendar. In fact, it is one of the popular marketing tools for local businesses, who give them away as promotional items, using them to advertise their products. After experimenting with a few different prototypes, we went with the wall calendar design.

For the user guide, we aimed for the design to be easily understood and followed, even without the instructional text. To replace the black and white photos from previous user guides, we opted for simple line drawings with highlights drawing attention to the particular parts.

OUTCOMES

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The getting started guide/quick reference guide exists in the form of a wall calendar:

  • Half of the the guide is reserved for everyday instructions, from morning till night
  • The other half functions as a calendar with different stickers as reminders such as change microphone covers, visit the clinic etc.
  • We also included a map of listening milestones to help set realistic expectations for recipients and carers.
  • Hanging on the wall, the calendar becomes part of everyday life for recipients and people around them.

The user guide is a simple design with step-by-step guidance for each action. It includes visual cues like highlighted parts, arrows to indicate direction and magnified views for detail. It is easy to follow and can be understood without text.

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MY ROLE

As the UX researcher and illustrator for this project, I was responsible for:

  • Conducting research on the target market and competitor analysis.
  • Building persona and mapping out the user journey to explore touch points.
  • Sketching and making prototypes for different design concepts.
  • Creating more than a hundred illustrations for the user guides.  
  • Working closely with the client and the team to refine the deliverables.

TEAM

  • Matt Morphett: Design strategist
  • Shane Morris: Design principal
  • Jack Hsu: Senior visual designer
  • Nhung Nguyen: UX researcher, Illustrator